Wednesday, March 9, 2016

The Wild West In Photos





Theodore Roosevelt and John Muir in Yosemite.:
Theodore Roosevelt and John Muir in Yosemite. Two men most responsible for the Nation Parks we have in California.
 

William Sydney Porter, aka O. Henry. Teller at First National Bank, Austin, 1891-1894.:
William Sydney Porter, aka O. Henry. Teller at First National Bank, Austin, 1891-1894.
Man, look at that fancy woodwork done by the craftsmen of the day!


Earthquake of August 31, 1886, centered near Charleston, SC, damaged many of the railroads in the area.:
Earthquake of August 31, 1886, centered near Charleston, SC, damaged many of the railroads in the area.
 
Old West gunfighter Bat Masterson. was a colorful figure - an army scout, gambler, buffalo hunter, frontier lawman in Dodge City, and eventually a US Marshall. He was friends with Wyatt Earp, and had visited Wyatt in Tombstone, Arizona shortly before the showdown at the OK Coral. Later in life, after the West had been tamed, he settled in New York City, and worked as a sportes editor for the New York Morning Telegraph.:
Old West gunfighter Bat Masterson. was a colorful figure - an army scout, gambler, buffalo hunter, frontier lawman in Dodge City, and eventually a US Marshall. He was friends with Wyatt Earp, and had visited
Wyatt in Tombstone, Arizona shortly before the showdown at the OK Coral. Later in life, after the West had been tamed, he settled in New York City, and worked as a sportes editor for the New York Morning Telegraph.
 
Wyoming, circa 1900, Overland by Stagecoach....Crossing the country by stagecoach was adventurous even by nineteenth-century standards. Nine people could squeeze inside a stagecoach; additional passengers sometimes traveled on the roof. Passengers remained sandwiched together for about 22 days, with only brief stops for meals and changes of stock or equipment.:
Wyoming, circa 1900, Overland by Stagecoach....Crossing the country by stagecoach was adventurous even by nineteenth-century standards. Nine people could squeeze inside a stagecoach; additional passengers sometimes traveled on the roof. Passengers remained sandwiched together for about 22 days, with only brief stops for meals and changes of stock or equipment.
 
#prostitute:
“Wanna buy me a drink, Cowboy?”  When women were pretty scarce, this was a welcoming site for the cowboy
who’d been on the range for weeks, seeing nothing but cows!
Photo of bareback bronc riding at the Buffalo Bill Rodeo:
Photo of bareback bronc riding at the Buffalo Bill Rodeo  These guys were real pro’s!
 
Wild Hearts Can't Be Broken. The real Sonora Webster Carver and her diving horse.:
Wild Hearts Can't Be Broken. The real Sonora Webster Carver and her diving horse.
 
Nevada s Tonopah to Sodaville stages meet on the road, circa 1903, for a rare respite. The iron engine would soon take their place as the next year, a 60-mile railroad connected Tonopah with the Carson and Colorado branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad at the Sodaville junction. The railroad would become known as the Tonopah and Goldfield Railroad.:
Nevada’s Tonopah to Sodaville stages meet on the road, circa 1903, for a rare respite. The iron engine would soon take their place as the next year, a 60-mile railroad connected Tonopah with the Carson and Colorado branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad at the Sodaville junction. The railroad would become known as the Tonopah and Goldfield Railroad.
 
Cowboy:
This cowboy’s house was dug in so that the insulation of the earth help keep it warm.  Today we would think of this as a root cellar, but to him it was home!
 
Saloon in Georgetown, Colorado:
A Saloon in Georgetown, Colorado.  Again, everyone wanted in the picture!
 
Log cabin in the mid 1880's - Washington CO, Minnesota:
Log cabin in the mid 1880's - Washington CO, Minnesota
 

New Mexico Cowboys 1880s:
A pair of New Mexico brothers get a studio shot in the 1880’s. 
The Old West:
Another studio shot showing everything that was important to this cowboy.  !880’s.
 
dorothea lange Depression photos:
A shot from the Great Depression, where a title for this picture might be...”I don’t know what to do next!”
 
Little Big Horn photo by Stanley Morrow 1879 -- courtesy Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument:
A Memorial placed on the battlefield of the Little Bighorn Massacre in 1879.
 
Frank Boardman
Frank Boardman "Pistol Pete" Eaton (October 26, 1860 – April 8, 1958) was an American author, cowboy, scout, Indian fighter, and Deputy U. S. Marshal for Judge Isaac C. Parker. He was also known to throw a coin in the air, draw and shoot it before it hit the ground.
 
Stone Hill,  MO.-  EARLY1900'S:
A store in Stone Hill, Missouri in the early 1900’s.
 
Cowboys.  Christoval, Texas late 1800's Women riding side saddle with Colt 45 peacemaker:
Cowboys. Christoval, Texas late 1800's Women riding side saddle with Colt 45 peacemaker.


I have these in an email, if anyone would like them, they are much larger, to be seen in greater detail. Please note my email at the top of the page, shoot me an email and I would be happy to forward to you, so that you may enjoy the full effect of the photos. 

9 comments:

Terry said...

What a great collection of photographs. Spending waaaay to much time searching for additional information on some of them.

If I can find enough information I may do a post on the South Carolina Railroad. It operated in South Carolina from 1843 to 1894, when it was succeeded by the Southern Railway.

Lisa Lane said...

As soon as I saw that train, I thought of you. Glad they have peaked your interest. Ken's mom sent them to me. Happy hunting! ; )

Chickenmom said...

Great, great photos! There used to be diving horses at the Steel Pier in Atlantic City, NJ many years ago.

Lisa Lane said...

Thanks Chickenmom, I bet that was something to see! I remember watching a movie years ago about them.

Jason Morris said...

Those are some sweet pictures. My dad's aunt made up a couple of family history books and they have quite a few of the old pictures like those, including some of the covered wagon that my grandmother and some of her siblings were born in on their trek through 7 different states. One of these days I will sit back and digest the books. Kind of sad though, all of these old people are gone now and when they were around I was too young to really listen to their stories. Grandma was one of fifteen and my dad was one of twelve, big families. I'll give you one quick story that I do know though.

Apparently my grandmother was a tough lady. Before she went to the hospital to give birth to one of the middle kids she made food for my grandfather and the other kids, cleaned the house, and did all the other chores she had. Three days after giving birth she was supposed to be picked up by my grandfather but he didn't so she walked something like four miles home. When she got home she found out that grandpa had his friends over sitting around drinking like usual. They ate all of the food and made a mess of the house. The kids were running around dirty as hell and starving. Grandma proceeded to the kitchen, grabbed a frying pan and knocked grandpa out with it. She then bathed all the kids, fed them, and then cut enough wood to heat the house for a few days.

Glad to see you are doing well and I emailed Angel two family recipes, one for chili and one for tamale pie. Bug her for them if you want them.

Lisa Lane said...

Jason, I love your story, because it sounds similar to my Granny...she had ten children, my Mom being the youngest. They came from Munday Texas when Mom was 10 months old, and I don't believe, according to Granny's stories that Grandad did much. She carried the load, he was a bit of a gambler, like his mother...who at one time was well off.

I will surely get with HWA for those recipes, I bet they are delicious!

Thanks for stopping in. Hope you come back soon. I remember sitting with Granny when she was in hospital with a brain tumor and she would tell me stories...and she had a hard life...I think that is what made us so strong...she left that for us...and for that I am thankful every single day of my life.

My cousins all tell me that I am the spitting image of her. That I take as a compliment, as she was a fine, strong woman. She loved hard, and cared for her family. A better woman could not be found.

Come back soon! ; )

fjord said...

Mucho appreciated!

Is it just me, but some black and white photos have such clarity and definition, they are far superior to the color and digital photos of today.

Kim Harrison said...

These are so much fun! Thank you and Ken for finding and sharing!!

Lisa Lane said...

Hi there fjord, no it is not just you...I love/prefer black/white, they are more beautiful to me, but with the MD, they are easier to see than color, so I agree completely..they are far superior! Thanks for stopping in! : )